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Not so fast, mammals! Part II by HodariNundu Not so fast, mammals! Part II by HodariNundu
Un monstruoso Indricotherium (rinoceronte sin cuernos de entre 12 y 20 toneladas) se convierte en presa de un aún mas monstruoso Crocodylus bugtiensis (¡primero en DA!)
Restos de este cocodrilo colosal de hasta 11 metros de largo- no tenia nada que envidiarle a los cocodrilos del Cretacico- han sido hallados en Baluchistán, en las mismas rocas que los de Indricotherium. Mas aun, los restos de este ultimo a menudo tienen las marcas de mordeduras de aquel, prueba de que no importa que tan grande llegues a ser, siempre habrá alguien capaz de comerte.

Este dibujo es una secuela de Not so fast, mammals!! hodarinundu.deviantart.com/art… tambien sobre un cocodrilo enorme... pero de tierra :D

A monstrous Indricotherium (hornless rhino that could weigh up to 12-20 tons) becomes prey of an even more monstrous Crocodylus bugtiensis (first in Deviantart!)
Remains of this colossal crocodile that could measure up to 11 meters long- in the same league as the famous Cretaceous supercrocs- have been found in Baluchistan, in the same rocks as Indricotherium. Even more- the fossil bones of the latter are often found with the bite marks of the croc, more proof that no matter how big you get, there will always be someone able to eat you.

Think of this as a sequel to Not so fast, mammals!! hodarinundu.deviantart.com/art… which also features a giant croc... but on land. :D
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:iconhelixdude:
Helixdude Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
"So you're the lousy bitch-of-a-mother who keeps dumping her kids!!"
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015
There goes WWB's line about Paraceratherium being too big to be attacked.
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:iconcaspion161:
caspion161 Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2015
i think it does need to watch for the leg
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2014
Well this just proves that you cant escape the food change no matter how big you get.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2014
Amphicoelias probably did
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:iconstark002:
stark002 Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2014
Holy smokin guns!!!!
Did this croc fight with the entelodonts and giant bear-dogs?
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2014
more likely just ate the mammals
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:iconstark002:
stark002 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2014
thats what I meant
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2014
It wouldn't even be a battle. that thing is over 4 times as large.
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2014
Im pretty sure both of them vey easy game if the croc ambushed them while they were drinking.
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:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2014
Interesting drawing.

I am very interested in how a ~5 tonne croc will fare against a ~11 tonne hyracodontid. I'm guessing not exactly very well.
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:iconrevolution2014:
Revolution2014 Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014
Crocs in Africa catch Cape Buffalo, do not know the weight ratio of them, but I think the crocs are much lighter. 
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:iconventurasalas:
VenturaSalas Featured By Owner May 2, 2014
No sabia de este titanico cocodrilo...hay fuentes de el? :D
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 3, 2014   General Artist
Lo leí en un libro que salió hace poco sobre indricoterios :B Creo que se llama Rhinoceros Giants o algo asi
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:iconventurasalas:
VenturaSalas Featured By Owner May 3, 2014
El libro Rhinoceros Giants? lo tienes? Waw!! *O* eh deseado ese libro desde hace mucho tiempo! Muchas gracias por afirmar. 
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:iconrajaharimau98:
RajaHarimau98 Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
What's the temporal range on the big C. bugtiensis (if you know)?
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:iconfatbeardc34:
fatbeardC34 Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2013
I think this is what I love most about you, Hodari. You take the all the badass prehistoric monsters that nobody has heard of and give them life. I sometimes just browse wikipedia's page for largest prehistoric lifeforms and when I search for an artistic interpretation of them, yours is often the first result. So thank you, Hodari, for giving the other monsters of the past some much needed attention.
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Crocs are AWESOME, no matter where or when... ;)
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:iconspinobuddy98:
spinobuddy98 Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013
yes they are
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
The first time, I've seen a Paraceratherium as an archosaur's meal! Awesome!
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:iconapexpredator7:
apexpredator7 Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2013
Nice job how do you always find new cool animals
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:iconsnakeman2013:
Snakeman2013 Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2013   General Artist
This is awsome. Go reptiles!
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:icontitanorex:
TitanoRex Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2013
crocs be hell on them mammals
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:iconmexicanzilla:
mexicanzilla Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
oh si tan solo ubiese algo similar en algun documental de la prehistoría....
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:iconspinobuddy98:
spinobuddy98 Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013
por eso los cocodrilos son mi animal favorito 
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013  Student General Artist
It's weird how there is very little info on these guys... you would think the media would eat this shit up since everyone and their parent believes that the giant "crocs" only lived the Mesozoic Era (despite the fact the Cenozoic having a whole lineage of land crocs that may have lived side-by-side with humans). 
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013
Now we need giant crocs that eat African elephants. XD
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:iconspermwhale165:
SpermWhale165 Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013  Student
Crocodylus bugtiensis VS Indricotherium...
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:iconkrajax:
Krajax Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013
I didn't know this existed until I came across this in Donald Prothero's new indricothere book. I think it's pretty awesome. Do you mind if I share this with the actual author on Facebook? I honestly think he'd appreciate your art ;)
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013   General Artist
I don´t mind :> I think someone already showed it to him, tho :D
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:iconucumari:
ucumari Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013
muy bueno lei sobre esas dos megabestias impresionantes un encuentro habria sido una batalla espectacular, me pregunto quien ganaria
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:iconpanzerraptor:
Panzerraptor Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013
This is so cool! Good to know there were still some toothy monsters kicking ass after the big rock dropped!
However, I'm pretty sure that the name "Indricotherium" has been dropped in favor of "Paraceratherium".
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013   General Artist
I did a quick check and apparently there was still debate on the matter so I went for the one I've been using the longest. Funnily enough, I knew the beast first as "Baluchitherium" :B
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:icontarturus:
Tarturus Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Guess this just goes to show that gigantic "super crocs" were not just confined to the Mesozoic. ^^
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013   General Artist
Not that it was unprecedented, tho :B
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:icontarturus:
Tarturus Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Indeed.
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:iconsaurophagus:
Saurophagus Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Dude, this is awesome! It's like a nile crocodile vs an elephantine wildebeest!
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Student Artist
Freaking cool man!:)
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:iconguilmon182:
guilmon182 Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Fucking cool! I didn't think there'd be much that could take on an indricothere, but sheesh!
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:iconstrong-1:
strong-1 Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013
The link to the previous work is broken.
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013   General Artist
Weird... D:
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013   General Artist
Fixed
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Student General Artist
This. is. awesome.
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:icontoshirotheknightwolf:
ToshirotheKnightWolf Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
O A O holy crap, there were giant croc even after the dinos!!!
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:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Awesome piece, there is Always a bigger fish, i mean croc :D
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:iconstevengordonart:
StevenGordonArt Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Ehh, I doubt that a fully grown Indricotherium would be considered prey for a crocodile, even of this size. A baby or young adult? Definitely, but not an adult. 


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:iconallosaurus-rex123:
Allosaurus-rex123 Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Well deinosuchus and sarcosuchus are know to attack large dinosaurs so it makes sense for a croc to prey on an indricotherium
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:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2014

Are known? there's only 3 cases of bite marks on dinosaur bones attributed to Deinosuchus, two on hadrosaurid remains, probably Kritosaurus and one in a small-ish theropod. Predation is not certain, however there's lots of turtle shells indicating that Deinosuchus frequently preyed on marine turtles.


There's no evidence of Sarcosuchus preying on any dinosaur, Sereno et al. conclusion basically says it could because its snout was more robust than in the gharial and that's it, when in fact its rostral proportion indicates that its snout was no wider than those of slender-snouted and freshwater crocodiles, that its snout was not only uniformly very shallow across all of its length (from 12 to 10cm) as it was its dentary but that the proportional size (most around 3 to 4cm, just 4 up to 7cm long), arrangement (equal to those of the much slender snouted Terminonaris and similar to that of Tomistoma) and number of its teeth (30 in the maxilla, much more than even the gharial) are more consistent with a mostly piscivorous diet, though given its size, full grown adults could have preyed and huge fish and small dinosaurs but there's nothing on Sarcosuchus anatomy indicating a macrophagus diet.

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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2014
there is a Appalachioaurus bone with healed-over Deinosuchus bite marks.

and false gharials routinely prey on deer and have eaten people so Sarcosuchus probably did eat dinosaurs once in a while.
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:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Edited Oct 16, 2014
That's the smallish theropod I was referring to in my comment, I'm not denying that Sarcosuchus was probably like the false gharial and could take on small prey relative to itself like small dinosaurs, what I'm saying is that nothing of its anatomy suggests it could kill something of its own size or bigger.
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