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Echoes of a past glory by HodariNundu Echoes of a past glory by HodariNundu
El silencio del Paleoceno es interrumpido brevemente cuando dos hadrosaurios vagabundos pasan por un claro del bosque.
Se han hallado restos de hadrosaurios que parecen provenir del Paleoceno, despues de la gran extincion que, oficialmente, exterminó a los dinosaurios no avianos. La mayoria de los paleontologos creen que los fosiles no son evidencia suficiente para afirmarlo, pero admiten que es posible que unos cuantos dinosaurios gigantes hallan sobrevivido por unos cuantos milenios despues del fin del periodo Cretáceo.
Cierta o no, la idea es interesante.

The silence of the Paleocene is briefly broken when two marauding hadrosaurs enter a forest clearing.
Fossil remains of hadrosaurs have been recovered from rocks of the Paleocene, just after the great extinction that, officially, wiped out the non avian dinosaurs.
Most paleontologists believe that these fossils are not good enough evidence to be sure, but they admit that it is possible that a few giant dinosaurs survived for some thousand years after the end of the Cretaceous.
True or not, the idea is interesting.
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:iconstevie-stevenson:
stevie-stevenson Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2013
interesting doesnt begin to cover this
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:iconmexicanzilla:
mexicanzilla Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
Vaya, me siento mal por esos Hadrosauridos
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:iconstark002:
stark002 Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
ARE YOU SERIOUS?
Reply
:iconucumari:
ucumari Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2013
quizas solos en un mundo que ya no reconcian acosados por una cantidad colosal de pequeños mamiferos que se comian sus huevos......
Reply
:iconprocyonnoumer:
ProcyonNoumer Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2013
Man in these last few years, we're unlocking more mysteries of the fossils and paleotolgy, we're creatng ourselfs more questions! Anyone agrees?
Reply
:iconallosaurus-rex123:
Allosaurus-rex123 Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
It usally takes millions of years for a animal to go exticnt so maybe this is true.
Reply
:iconspinobuddy98:
spinobuddy98 Featured By Owner May 10, 2012
no se porque pero tu dibujo me dio lastima por los hadrosaurios , tal vaz por ser los ultimos :(
Reply
:iconleucasaurio:
leucasaurio Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
hasta ahora vengo avers esta ilustracion tuya de los hadrosaurio en el paleoceno ,digo asi como debio haber hadrosaurio me imagino que otros dinosaurios debeierno sobrevivir quizas uno que otros parientes de los tiranosaurios , otambien reptiles marinos
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2012   General Artist
si, es muy probable
Reply
:iconamericanraptor:
AmericanRaptor Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I did hear a few months back that from some samples, some dinosaurs did manage to survive the K-T event for at least 700,000 years.
Reply
:iconmar16cris:
mar16cris Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
the problem with the geologic time scale is that people thinks this periods ends abruptly with all life disappearing.....the KT event must not have killed all the dinos, the remain ones just suffered the sequels of the events but what happened next?, why the little dinos couldnt do it?.....maybe they survived untile the "paleocene" and mammals became a challenge they couldnt deal with.
we havent found dinosaurs skeletons in later periods cause finding bones is to hard enough, how many deposits the world haves?......maybe they existed in recent times but preservation is really a miracle.....
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:iconelectreel:
electreel Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2011
Interesante
Reply
:icontehfuzzyduck:
TehFuzzyDuck Featured By Owner May 16, 2009
Evocative illustration. Well done.
Reply
:iconfirehazard123:
FIREHAZARD123 Featured By Owner May 11, 2009
beautiful... just beautiful *sniff*
Reply
:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner May 11, 2009
Por unos cuantos milenios mas, y después no supieron donde meterse :( :crying:
Reply
:iconderkompsognatus:
DerKompsognatus Featured By Owner May 6, 2009
To me this seems pretty possible, such a giant diversity of animals can't disappear in just couple of million years!
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 6, 2009  Student Writer
Well, I don't expect a massive asteroid bigger than Mt. Everest to let pass any non-avian dinosaur (except perhaps insignificant alvarezsaurids and other little down balls, but nothing near an hadrosaur)

Plus, several mammal groups (specially metatherians and multituberculates) suffered a heavy blow during the mass extinction, and so did most sphenodonts (now reduced to the pathetic tuatara) and many other animals that had more chances of surviving than dinosaurs
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:iconcoluber:
Coluber Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010
I was wondering what had happened to the triconodonts. Did they go extinct with the dinosaurs, or before?
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2010  Student Writer
I think they were replaced by other mammals as the Cretaceous went on
Reply
:iconderkompsognatus:
DerKompsognatus Featured By Owner May 6, 2009
Sorry, didn't mean to write "such"!
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Student Writer
I'm very skeptical about the claims the remains are cenozoic in nature (considering landslides and other hazards could simply had placed mesozoic fossils in cenozoic sediments), but overall a good picture. Its funny how mammals already began showing signs of domination before the extinction, with the average size of late Cretaceous mammals being over 15 kilos
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
Well, large dinosaurs became rarer and less diverse towards the end of the Cretaceous. Maybe they (the mammals) were not being eaten as much as before...
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Student Writer
Well, the reason why big dinosaurs could had become less diverse is either because the fossil record becomes more scarse in the late Cretaceous (it seems that, as the Mesozoic went on, less fossil sites formed, or that there are still undiscovered Maastrichian fossil basins), or simply because they were big; many dinosaurs, like tyrannosaurs, were highly precocial, meaning that they occupied several niches across their lifetime, and thus decreasing their diversity.

T-rex, for example, was actually America's main predator when it lived, and not even dromeosaurs were big enough to compete with it (by the Maastrichian, all american dromeosaurs were usually beaver sized). And let's not even mention pterosaurs, which were precocial as well (a Quetzalcoatlus, for example, could had started its life as a Pterodactylus like form and ended in a massive monster by the adult age).

Its worth to note, though, that mammals were always a bit towards the dominant side since the Jurassic, when aquatic, borrowing, gliding and even some carnivorous forms (which might actually had lived alongside a BIGGER mammalian carnivore), and its only a matter of time we find quite large mammals, specially in the poles, where their competitors, lepidosaurs and terrestrial crocodillians, were less common
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 6, 2009   General Artist
Now that was a long reply. :D
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 6, 2009  Student Writer
Darling, you've seen a LITTLE summary of what I was going to say
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 6, 2009   General Artist
:O Well, I got your point ;)

And I think this is the first time a guy calls me darling :D
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 6, 2009  Student Writer
Don't get used to it. I just use it in mocking situations, because I don't need to sound more gay than I already am
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 6, 2009   General Artist
It's all right XD
Reply
:iconhyphenatedsuperhero:
hyphenatedsuperhero Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Muy cierto, es una idea interesante...
Y muy bien logrado el escenario, también.
Reply
:iconhinotebenikaze:
HinoteBenikaze Featured By Owner May 5, 2009
I can see it being possible. There are always a few stragglers, and while geologically speaking it was a fast change between the times, it was still a very long stretch of time.
Reply
:iconmarceliskhaldern:
MarcelisKhaldern Featured By Owner May 5, 2009
but why would the avian dinosaurs like the rex and such perish while dinosaurs like hadrosaurs survive, if the theory is correct?
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
Maybe they did and their remains weren´t preserved or are yet to be found. But most likely, because there were so few large dinosaurs left that they just couldn´t find enough food.

Or perhaps the remains aren´t even Paleocene. Who knows?
Reply
:iconmarceliskhaldern:
MarcelisKhaldern Featured By Owner May 5, 2009
maybe there are some still left today, in an underground cavern, in the darkest reaches of africa! XD lol
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
Dreaming is for free :D
Reply
:iconmarceliskhaldern:
MarcelisKhaldern Featured By Owner May 5, 2009
hehe, not sure about that, still, its a fun concept
Reply
:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Non-avian dinosaurs beyond the Mesozoic era in real life? That can't be true. Can it?
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
It can. After all, Mesozoic and Cenozoic were invented by humans.
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:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Y'mean the names only, right?
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
Right
Reply
:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Still, there's no way the non-avian dinosaurs could've survived beyond 65 million years, no way. I'm still a bit skeptic with this, to be honest.
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
I'd say kinda narrow minded. Never say no way, my friend. ;)
Reply
:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, since ya put it that way...
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Student Writer
So am I, considering Cretaceous fossils could just had ended up in Cenozoic basins due to hazards
Reply
:icontelmatosaurus:
Telmatosaurus Featured By Owner May 6, 2009
You sound like Cutter from Primeval and his Eocene fossil of a placoderm!

BTW! Thanks for the info on the Mediteranean "Mega" fauna!
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner May 6, 2009  Student Writer
Unlike Primeval RL has no time anomalies, so...
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's a shocker (figuratively).
Reply
:iconbran-artworks:
Bran-Artworks Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Student General Artist
Interesante, creo haber leido algo de esos hadrosaurios, son esos Purgatorius :O?
Reply
:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner May 5, 2009   General Artist
En realidad, no tengo idea de qué son. Asi salieron de la pluma :D
Reply
:iconbran-artworks:
Bran-Artworks Featured By Owner May 6, 2009  Student General Artist
Jaja debi imaginarlo :D aunque al estar en primer casi siempre me indica una criatura conocida .
Reply
:icondinodude0091:
dinodude0091 Featured By Owner May 5, 2009
Oh yeah, I read an article in the newspaper about that on Saturday! Pretty cool, eh?
Reply
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