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About Varied / Artist Member Justin CaseMale/Unknown Group :iconpeopleforherps: PeopleForHerps
Dedicated to the best animals.
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**PLEASE READ**

This is an art gallery, not a science site. Most of the art here is nature and science inspired, but is NOT scientific illustration. Expect little accuracy, and you may actually enjoy it. :B

PS- Kind of funny how I have to specify this, this being an art site and all...

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With Spinosaurus!! Ok, you probably already knew, judging by the number of Spinos in my gallery, but damn, have you seen the restored skeleton?! :D It's beautiful, just... just look at it :D

news.nationalgeographic.com/ne…

Best part is, it WAS aquatic and probably had webbed feet just like in my doodles! :D I was having a bad day but now I'm smiling again XD

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:iconcodyknepper:
codyknepper Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Student Traditional Artist
I uploaded this a long time ago but re uploaded it. Here is a link to one of your drawings that I redid, I redid a few of your projects actually. I will always give multiple forms of credit to you in any future remakes I do of your projects.

codyknepper.deviantart.com/art…
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner 6 hours ago   General Artist
I remember this :> why did u change account?
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:iconcodyknepper:
codyknepper Featured By Owner 3 hours ago  Student Traditional Artist
I created my first account when I was 17 and was active for about a year then I stop updating it. Not only did I forget the password, I forgot the username and I no longer had the email I use. I am 23 now and have alot of artwork to update a new account with. Seemed like a fresh start I guess.
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:icondinostory:
dinostory Featured By Owner Edited 4 days ago
have you thought about drawing Spinosarus vs Tyrannosaurus part 2 this time with the new spinosaur look?
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner 4 days ago   General Artist
somehow I think it wouldn´t be much of a fight
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Professional General Artist
XII EAVP Meeting – Torino 24-28 June 2014 – Abstract Book 68 NEW MATERIAL OF THE ENIGMATIC GIANT VIPERID LAOPHIS CROTALOIDES (SQUAMATA, SERPENTES) FROM THE PLIOCENE OF GREECE, WITH COMMENTS ON REPTILIAN GIGANTISM IN THE NEOGENE OF SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE G.L. Georgalis1*, B.P. Kear2, N.E. Campione2, Z. Szyndlar3, M. Pavia4, and M. Delfino4,5 1 School of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54-124, Thessaloniki, Greece 2 Palaeobiology Program, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavägen 16, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden 3 Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Slawkowska 17, 31-016 Krakow, Poland 4 Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, via Valperga Caluso, 35-10125 Torino, Italy 5 Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici ICP, Campus de la UAB s/n, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain *dimetrodon82@yahoo.gr Keywords : Laophis, Viperidae, Neogene, gigantism. A fragmentary isolated vertebra from the early Pliocene of Megalo Emvolon (also known Karabournou) in Northern Greece is referred to the gigantic extinct viper Laophis crotaloides Owen. This taxon was originally named on the basis of 13 vertebrae recovered from Megalo Emvolon in 1857, and subsequently lodged in the collection of The Natural History Museum in London. Unfortunately, the type remains have since been lost and the species thus ignored or relegated to a nomen dubium, in spite of its estimated body length having potentially exceeded 3.5 metres. The incomplete and isolated nature of the new Laophis specimen hinders resolution to lower taxonomic levels. However, the fossil can be unequivocally placed within Viperidae because of its proportionally wide cotyle and condyle (the latter being markedly robust), probable presence of a hypapophysis, and most notably its dorsally tilted prezygapophyseal facets. Moreover, a multivariate quantitative approach supports previous assertions of large body size with an estimated maximum length and body mass, comparable to, if not larger than Lachesis muta, the largest extant viperid - a size that distinguish Laophis as amongst the largest extinct or extant venomous snakes ever known. The presence of a colossal viperid within the late Neogene ecosystems of mainland Greece is also significant because it concurs with the distribution of other gigantic Mio-Pliocene reptiles, including the large elapid Naja sp., another substantial but indeterminate species of Vipera, the varanid lizard Varanus marathonensis, and the colossal tortoises Cheirogaster. Similar coeval taxa have been found throughout the Balkan peninsula, southwestern Europe, and Asia Minor, and coincide with the onset of widespread climatic cooling during the late Miocene–late Pliocene. The spread of savannah grasslands throughout Mediterranean Europe during this time has been used to explain increased body sizes in herbivorous tortoises via dietary selection for greater consumption of C4 vegetation. However alternative ecological and/or physiological factors must be sought for large ectothermic predators, which would have had to effectively compete within a trophic system otherwise dominated by a broad range of mammalian carnivores.

New Abstract about Laophis crotaloides, so apparently around 3.5 metres long plus :)
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner 5 days ago   General Artist
There! Told you it was big! :D

Thanks for sharing!
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Professional General Artist
It's good news I agree.
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:icontwoworldsonekingdom:
twoworldsonekingdom Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2014
Have you ever thought of making a documentary?
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:iconhodarinundu:
HodariNundu Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2014   General Artist
When I was a kid I recorded a documentary about a lost world-sort of land, using plastic animals and lots of glue and shaving foam for the gooey parts :B

More recently? Nope. Documentaries cost money. :B
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